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Oral Sources

Appendix V

Oral Sources for the Märchen in the KHM Volume I, 1812

The people who told the Brothers Grimm the stories are listed in the handwritten annotations in the first edition of the first volume of the Kinder- und Hausmärchen by the Brothers Grimm. The Anhang (Appendix) in the 1812 KHM lists the literary sources for the stories and other variations. The information listed below is from these handwritten annotations and by information listed in The Anmerkungen (Annotations) to the Kinder- und Hausmärchen by the Brothers Grimm by Johannes Bolte and Georg Polívka, Leipzig Vol. I 1913, Vol. II 1915, and Vol. III 1918. New (current) scholarly information may be different.

Together these sources account for most of the stories listed in the first volume of the KHM. They are not exclusive. For example, while #62 Bluebeard, is listed here as being told to the Brothers Grimm by the Hassenpflug family, it is also listed as a Märchen by Charles Perrault in the Anhang. #29 The Devil with the Three Golden Hairs, is listed below as being told to the Brothers Grimm by the 12 year old Amalie Hassenpflug in the autum of 1812, but in the Anhang, they also describe it as being in Johann Gustav Gottlieb Büschings Volks-Sagen, Märchen und Legenden.

 

1. The Frog King or The Iron Heinrich

From Hessen.

 

2. Catz and Maus in Company

From Hessen. Told by Gretchen Wild in Kassel, 1808.  Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819).

 

3. Marienkind (Mary's Child)

 From Hessen. Told by Gretchen Wild in Kassel, 1807.  Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819).

 

4. Nine-Pins and Card Game

From Hessen. From Siebert. Ferdinand Siebert (1791-1847).

 

5. The Wolf and The Seven Young Dam-lings

From the Main area.

 

7. Regarding The Stolen Heller

Told by Gretchen Wild in Kassel, 1808. Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819).

 

9. The Twelve Brothers

From Zwehrn. Told to the Brothers Grimm by Dorothea Viehmann (1755 - 1815). This notation is probably wrong. Since she did not meet the Brothers Grimm until 1813, this might refer to the later revised version of the story. Niederzwehrn, the southern most part of the city of Kassel. Hans-Jörg Uther states that it is possibly from oral  telling by Julia (1792-1862) and Charlotte (1793-1853) Ramus. (Grimm/Rölleke 1975, 64-69, 354f.).

 

Hans-Jörg Uther, "Handbuch zu den Kinder und Hausmärchen der Bruder Grimm," de Gruyter 2013.

 

10. Das Lumpengesindel

From the Paderborn area, an area in North Rhine-Westphalia. Told by August von Haxthausen (1792  1866), May 19, 1812.

 

11. Brüderchen und Schwesterchen

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856), March 10, 1811.

 

12. Rapunzel

Told by Jacob Grimm.

 

13. Three Manlings in The Forest

Told by Dortchen Wild in Kassel, October 9, 1812. Henriette

Dorothea Wild  (1793  1867).

 

14. Regarding The Cruel Flaxspinning

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860) in 1812.

 

15. Hänsel und Gretel

From various tellings from Hessen. Told by Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

16. Herr Fix und Fertig

Told by Friederich Krause (1747  1828) in 1811. A retired Dragonwachmeister (Dragoon watch master).

 

17. The White Snake

Told by the family Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) in Kassel in the autum of 1812.

 

18. Strawstem Ember and Bean on Travels

Told by Frau Wild (Henriette's mother) in Kassel. Dorothea Catharina Wild (1752  1813).

 

19. Regarding The Fisher and His Wife

From a letter by Philipp Otto Runge (1777 - 1810).

 

20. Regarding a Brave Tailor

From the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family, February 10, 1812.

 

24. Frau Holle (Mother Hulda)

Told by Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867) in Kassel,  October 13, 1811 in the garden.

 

25. The Three Ravens

From the Main areas.

 

26. Rothkäppchen (Little Red Ridinghood)

The first version is told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860) in Kassel, in the autum of 1812. The 2nd version is told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856), in the autum of 1812.

 

28. The Singing Bone

Told by Dortchen Wild in Kassel, January 19, 1812 by the oven in the gardenhouse. Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

29. Of The Devil with Three Golden Hairs

Told by Amalie Hassenpflug (1800  1871), autum 1812. Note: she is 12 years old when she tells the story.

 

30. Louse-let and Flea-let

Told by Frau Wild (Henriette's mother) in Kassel in 1808. Dorothea Catharina Wild (1752  1813).

 

31. Maiden without Hands

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856), in the Wild house, March 10, 1811.

 

32. The Clever Hans

From the Main areas.

 

33. The Booted Tom Cat

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860) in the autum of 1812.

 

34. Hanses Trine

Told by Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867) September 29, 1811 in the garden.

 

36/I. Regarding the Tablechen-Set-Yourself, the Gold Donkey and the Stick-From-Sack.

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860) in the autum of 1812 who heard it from an old Mamsell Storch by Henschel.

 

36/II. Regarding The Tablechen

Told by Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867) October 1, 1811.

 

37. Regarding The Serviette

Told by Friederich Krause (1747  1828) in 1811. A retired Dragonwachmeister (Dragoon watch master).

38. Regarding Frau Füchsin

Told by Ludovica Jordis née Brentano (1787  1859) in the autum of 1812. Ludovica is the sister of Clemens Brentano.

 

39. Regarding The Wichtelmännern

Told by Dortchen Wild in Kassel. Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867). All three stories.

 

40. The Robber Bridegroom

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856).

 

41. Herr Korbes

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860) in 1810.

 

42. The Herr Gefatter

Told by Amalie Hassenpflug (1800  1871).

 

44. The Gefatter Death

Told by Marie Elizabeth Wild (1794  1867) October 20, 1811.

 

45. The Tailors Daumerlings Wanderings

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856).

 

46. Fitchers Vogel

Told by Frederike Mannel (1783 - 1833) and Dortchen Wild (1793  1867) in Kassel.

 

47. Regarding The Juniper Tree

From a letter (indirectly) by Philipp Otto Runge (1777 - 1810).

 

48. The Old Sultan

Told by Friederich Krause (1747  1828) in 1811. A retired

Dragonwachmeister (Dragoon Watch Master).

 

49. The Six Swans

Told by Dortchen Wild in Kassel, January 19, 1812 by the oven in the garden house. Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

50. Dornröschen (Brier Rose, Sleeping Beauty)

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856).

 

51. Regarding Foundling-Bird

Told by Frederike Mannel (1783 - 1833) from the Schwalm area in Hessen.

 

52. König Drosselbart (King Thrushbeard)

The beginning from the Hassenpflugs (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie), the end by Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

53. Sneewittchen (Schneeweisschen) ) (Snow White)

Told by the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family, and from Ferdinand Siebert (1791 - 1847).

 

54. Hans Dumm

Told by the Hassenpflugs (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) September 29, 1812.

 

55. Rumpelstilzchen

Told by Dorothea Wild  (1793  1867) March 10, 1811 and from the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family.

 

56. The Dearest Roland

Told by Dortchen Wild in the garden house, January 19, 1812. Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

57. Regarding Golden Bird

From Hessen.

 

58. Regarding The Loyal Godfather Sparrow

Told by Gretchen Wild in Kassel, 1808. Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819).

 

59. Prince Swan

Told by Gretchen Wild in Kassel, 1807. Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819).

 

60. The Goldegg

Told by Dortchen Wild. Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

61. Regarding The Tailor Who Soon Became Rich

Told by the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family, April 18, 1811.

 

62. Bluebeard

Told by the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family, autum 1812.

 

63. Goldchildren

Told by Frederike Mannel (1783 - 1833).

 

64/I. Regarding The Dummling

Told by Gretchen Wild in Kassel, 1808. Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819).

 

64/II. Regarding The Dummling

From Hessen.

 

65. Allerleirauh

Told by Dortchen Wild in Kassel October 9, 1812. Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867).

 

66. Hurleburlebutz

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860). September 29, 1812.

 

67. The King with The Lion

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860) in the summer of 1812.

 

68. Regarding The Summer- and Winter- Garden

Told by Ferdinand Siebert (1791 - 1847).

 

70. The Okerlo

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860). The last paragraph was added by Oberst Wilhelm Engelhards (1754  1818) on August 1, 1811.

 

71. Princess Mouse-skin

Told by Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860).

 

72. The Birnli Will Not Fall

Oral from Switzerland.

 

74. Regarding Johannes-Wassersprung and Caspar-Wassersprung

Told by Frederike Mannel (1783 - 1833) in 1808.

 

75. Bird Phoenix

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856) February 10, 1812.

 

76. The Carnation

Told by the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family September 29, 1812.

 

77. Regarding The Carpenter and The Turner

"No source listed."

 

79. The Water Nymph

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856).

 

80. Regarding The Death of The Hen-let

The end is by Oberst Engelhards in Kassel. The family of Oberst Wilhelm Engelhards (1754  1818).

 

81. The Smith and The Devil

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856) December 1, 1812. The date is notable because it is a story at the end of the volume I, very shortly (19 days) before the publication of the book.

 

83. The Poor Maiden

"Written after a dark memory."

 

84. The In Law Mother

Told by the Hassenpflug (Amalie, Jeanette, and Marie) family, April 18, 1811.

 

85a. Snow Flower

French.

 

85b. Princess with The Louse

Told by Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856) April 18, 1811.

 

86. The Fox and The Geese

August von Haxthausen (1792  1866). 

 

The age in 1812, title and number of stories by the contributors is listed and summarized below. What is interesting to see is that the contributors are either very young or very old. Wilhelm and Jacob themselves were very young - 26 and 27 respectively in 1812 when Volume I of their KHM was published. J.R.R Tolkien in contrast was 44 when the Hobbit was published, 62 when the Lord of the Rings was published.

 

When one looks at the relatively young age of the Grimms when the KHM was published, and the length, the breadth of their careers and works, it is amazing in a time when only quill pens, ink and paper were available to them. Even with computers and modern technology, it seems that it would be difficult to reproduce such works today.

 

Hassenpflug Family - 28 stories in Volume I.

Marie Hassenpflug (1788  1856). 24 years old.

Jeanette Hassenpflug (1791  1860). 21 years old.

Amalie Hassenpflug (1800  1871). 12 years old.

 

11. Brüderchen und Schwesterchen

14. Regarding The Cruel Flaxspinning

17. The White Snake

20. Regarding a Brave Tailor

26I. Rothkäppchen (Little Red Ridinghood)

29. Of The Devil with Three Golden Hairs

31. Maiden without Hands

33. The Booted Tom Cat

36/I. Regarding The Tablechen-Set-Yourself, The Gold Donkey and The Stick-From-Sack.

40. The Robber Bridegroom

41. Herr Korbes

42. The Herr Gefatter

45. The Tailors Daumerlings Wanderings

50. Dornröschen (Brier Rose, Sleeping Beauty)

52. König Drosselbart (King Thrushbeard)

53. Sneewittchen (Schneeweisschen) ) (Snow White)

55. Rumpelstilzchen

61. Regarding The Tailor Who Soon Became Rich

62. Bluebeard

66. Hurleburlebutz

70. The Okerlo

71. Princess Mouse-skin

75. Bird Phoenix

76. The Carnation

79. The Water Nymph

81. The Smith and The Devil

84. The In Law Mother

85b. Princess with The Louse

 

 

 

 

 

Wild Family - 24 stories in Volume I.

Dorothea Catharina Wild (1752  1813). The mother of Henriette and Margarethe Wild, 60 years old.

Henriette Dorothea Wild (1793  1867). 19 years old. Married Wilhlem Grimm.

Margarethe Marianne Wild (1787  1819). 25 years old.

 

2. Catz and Maus in Company

3. Marienkind (Mary's Child)

7. Regarding the Stolen Heller

13. Three Manlings in The Forest

15. Hänsel und Gretel

18. Strawstem Ember and Bean on Travels

24. Frau Holle (Mother Hulda)

26II. Rothkäppchen (Little Red Ridinghood)

28. The Singing Bone

30. Louse-let and Flea-let

34. Hanses Trine

36/II. Regarding The Tablechen-Set-Yourself, The Gold Donkey and The Stick-From-Sack.

39. Regarding The Wichtelmännern

44. The Gefatter Death

46. Fitchers Vogel

49. The Six Swans

52. König Drosselbart (King Thrushbeard)

55. Rumpelstilzchen

56. The Dearest Roland

58. Regarding The Loyal Godfather Sparrow

59. Prince Swan

60. The Goldegg

64/I. Regarding The Dummling

65. Allerleirauh (Thousandfurs, etc.)

 

 

Frederike Mannel - 4 stories in Volume I.

Frederike Mannel (1783 - 1833). 29 years old.

 

46. Fitchers Vogel

51. Regarding Foundling-Bird

63. Goldchildren

74. Regarding Johannes-Wassersprung & Caspar Wassersprung

 

Friederich Krause - 3 stories in Volume I.

Friederich Krause (1747  1828). 65 years old.

 

16. Herr Fix und Fertig

37. Regarding The Serviette

48. The Old Sultan

 

Ferdinand Siebert - 3 stories in Volume I.

Ferdinand Siebert (1791 - 1847). 21 years old.

 

4. Nine-Pins and Card Game

53. Sneewittchen (Schneeweisschen) ) (Snow White)

68. Regarding the Summer- and Winter- Garden

Wilhelm Engelhards - 2 stories in Volume I.

Oberst Wilhelm Engelhards (1754  1818) & family. 58 years old.

 

70. The Okerlo

80. Regarding the Death of The Hen-let

 

 

 

 

Philipp Otto Runge (Age 33) - 2 stories in Volume I.

Philipp Otto Runge (1777 - 1810). Died before the publication.

 

19. Regarding The Fisher and His Wife

47. Regarding The Juniper Tree

August von Haxthausen - 2 stories in Volume I.

August von Haxthausen (1792  1866). Full name: August Franz Ludwig Maria, Baron von Haxthausen-Abbenburg. 20 years old.

 

10. Das Lumpengesindel

86. The Fox and The Geese

Ludovica Jordis

Ludovica Jordis née Brentano (1787  1859). 25 years old.

 

38. Regarding Frau Füchsin

Dorothea Viehmann

Dorothea Viehmann (1755 - 1815). Contributor to the 1815 ed.

 

9. The Twelve Brothers

The actual contributors are most likely: Julia (1792-1862) and Charlotte (1793-1853) Ramus. See #9.